General Dermatology

Acne

Acne is the term for plugged pores (blackheads and whiteheads), pimples, and even deeper lumps (cysts or nodules) that occur on the face, neck, chest, back, shoulders and even the upper arms. Acne is a common skin condition caused by inflammation of the hair follicles and oil-producing (sebaceous) glands of the skin. Acne may begin during puberty, and affects about 80 percent of all adolescents as well as many adults.

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Actinic Keratoses

Actinic keratoses (AKs) are the early beginnings of skin cancer. This most common lesion of the outermost layer of the skin (epidermis) is caused by long-term exposure to sunlight (specifically to ultraviolet wavelengths). AKs are defined as a cutaneous dysplasia of the epidermis. In everyday terms, AKs are an alteration in size, shape and organization of skin cells.

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Allergic Skin Conditions

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Atypical Moles (Dysplastic Nevi)

About one out of every ten people has at least one unusual (or atypical) mole that looks different from an ordinary mole. The medical term for these unusual moles is dysplastic nevi. Doctors believe that dysplastic nevi are more likely than ordinary moles to develop into a type of skin cancer called melanoma. Because of this, moles should be checked regularly by a doctor or nurse specialist, especially if they look unusual, grow larger, or change in color, outline, or in any other way.

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Collagen Vascular Disease

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Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects the skin. It is not contagious; it cannot be passed from one person to another. The word “dermatitis” means inflammation of the skin. “Atopic” refers to a group of diseases where there is often an inherited tendency to develop other allergic conditions, such as asthma and hay fever. In atopic dermatitis, the skin becomes extremely itchy. Scratching leads to redness, swelling, cracking, “weeping” clear fluid, and finally, crusting and scaling. Atopic dermatitis is often referred to as “eczema,” which is a general term for the several types of inflammation of the skin. Atopic dermatitis is the most common of the many types of eczema.

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Fungal Infections

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Hair Loss (Alopecia)

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Herpes & Shingles

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Insect Bites And Stings

The majority of insect stings in the U.S. come from yellow jackets, hornets, wasps, bees, and fire ants. An allergic reaction to an insect sting can occur immediately, within minutes, or even hours after the sting. Such a reaction is characterized by hives, itchiness, and swelling in areas other than the sting site, difficulty in breathing, dizziness or a sharp drop in blood pressure, nausea, cramps or diarrhea, unconsciousness and cardiac arrest. Tick bites can cause Lyme disease. Usually a flat, reddish rash spreads from the site of the tick bite, and there may be more generalized body symptoms, such as fever, muscle aches, fatigue and headache.

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Lichen Sclerosus

Lichen sclerosus is a rare skin disorder that can affect men, women, or children, but is most common in women. It usually occurs on the vulva (the outer genitalia or sex organ) in women, but sometimes develops on the head of the penis in men. Occasionally, lichen sclerosus is seen on other parts of the body, especially the upper body, breasts, and upper arms. It begins as small, subtle white spots and develops into bigger patches with the skin surface becomes thinned and crinkled. Symptoms are most often mild and go away over time.

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Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic, genetic, noncontagious skin disorder that appears in many different forms and can affect any part of the body. It is most commonly found on the scalp, elbows, knees, hands, feet, and genitals. Psoriasis may be one of several types: plaque psoriasis, pustular psoriasis, erythrodermic psoriasis, guttate psoriasis or inverse psoriasis. In its various forms, it may be characterized by itching, swelling, redness, scaly patches, blisters and/or bumps.

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Rosacea

Rosacea is a chronic disease that affects the skin and sometimes the eyes. The disorder is characterized by redness, pimples, and, in advanced stages, thickened skin. Rosacea usually affects the face; other parts of the upper body are only rarely involved.

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Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a disease that causes flaking of the skin. It usually affects the scalp. In adolescents and adults, it is commonly called “dandruff.” In babies, it is known as “cradle cap.” Seborrheic dermatitis can also affect the skin on other parts of the body, such as the face and chest, and the creases of the arms, legs and groin. Seborrheic dermatitis usually causes the skin to look a little greasy and scaly or flaky.

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Skin Infections

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Skin Cancer

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Varicose & Spider Veins

Varicose veins are enlarged, twisted, painful superficial veins resulting from poorly functioning valves. Blood remains in the vein and pooling of blood causes the vein to enlarge. This process usually occurs in the veins of the legs, although it may occur elsewhere. Varicose veins are common, affecting mostly women. Causes include congenitally defective valves, thrombophlebitis, and pregnancy. Prolonged standing and increased pressure within the abdomen may increase susceptibility to the development of varicose veins or aggravate the condition.

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Vitiligo

Vitiligo is a pigmentation disorder in which the pigment cells (melanocytes) in the skin, the mucous membranes, and the retina are destroyed. As a result, white patches of skin appear on different parts of the body. The hair that grows in areas affected by vitiligo usually turns white. The cause of vitiligo is not known.

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